Chicago Public Schools

Amanda Vinicky

The massive unfunded Illinois pension obligation has made reducing the state's costs a priority for years.

An overhaul of retirement benefits for state employees, public school teachers and university workers has been the subject of talks between state leaders in recent months.

Gov. Bruce Rauner said as much Wednesday, but he sounded uncertain as to what will come of it.

The state Supreme Court has ruled that a previous law cutting pension benefits was unconstitutional.

cps.edu

Chicago Public Schools are laying off about 1,000 employees, including nearly 500 teachers. But officials expect most to be hired for other open positions.

Officials with the nation's third-largest school district said Friday that those affected will be eligible to apply for other jobs in the district, which has about 1,000 teaching vacancies.

The teacher layoffs include 302 at high schools and 192 at elementary schools.

The others include 352 high school support personnel and 140 personnel at elementary schools.

twitter.com/BruceRauner

  With the current budget standoff, Illinois has no immediate plans to fund schools.

 

Governor Bruce Rauner has ridiculed Democratic plans for giving too much to Chicago Public Schools.

 

cps.edu

The head of Chicago Public Schools says the district has "reached the point of no return" and faces severe cuts without "equal" funding from the state.

Schools CEO Forrest Claypool led hundreds of teachers, parents, and students in a rally in Springfield on Thursday seeking more state funds for Chicago's schools. The district faces a $1 billion deficit next school year.

Claypool said Wednesday that with only one week left in the state Legislature's session, the district must "make a statement the governor cannot ignore."

Steve Johnson / Flickr/Creative Commons

Water service to a Chicago public school has been cut after tests revealed an elevated lead level.

Officials said Friday that water coolers have been delivered to Tanner Elementary School in the South Side Grand Crossing neighborhood.

The lead was discovered as the district tested water at 32 Chicago schools.

Lead was found in the water of six schools at levels below Environmental Protection Agency standards. Testing will now be done at 250 additional schools, most built before 1986.

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