community college

Illinois Officials Seek Input On Adult Education Plan

Jan 8, 2018
Flickr user Dave Herholz/CC 2.0

The Illinois Community College Board is calling on residents to give feedback on its draft five-year strategic plan to improve adult education.

The plan includes ways to remove financial barriers for adults wanting to pursue post-secondary education. Matt Berry is with the Illinois Community College Board. He said having a college degree is becoming more essential in the workforce.

Flickr User Brent Hoard/ "ECU School of Education Class Room" (cc by 2.0)

For the past several years, Illinois has been losing more college students than any state except New Jersey. Last year, as higher education was starved by the state budget impasse, that trend continued.

Overall, undergraduate enrollment decreased by 2 percent, with even steeper drops at public universities and community colleges. 

Schools defying this trend include those focused on medical professions, such as City Colleges of Chicago's Malcolm X campus. Mark Potter, the provost, said its home in the medical district makes it more attractive.

"Money" By Flickr User Pictures of Money / (CC BY 2.0)

The state’s ongoing budget impasse has hit community colleges particularly hard, with funds to these schools and the students who attend them drastically reduced.


The Illinois Community College Board is distributing $3 million dollars in emergency aid, divided among seven campuses.


Flickr user Brent Hoard "ECU School of Education Class Room" (CC BY 2.0)

About half of Illinois high school graduates who went on to enroll in community colleges had to take remedial courses, according to a report released by the Illinois State Board of Education.

The board used data from the Class of 2013, matched with data from the Illinois Community College Board.

The Community College Board’s director -- Karen Hunter Anderson -- says Illinois participates in a program designed to boost graduation rates, and ranks fairly high.

Susan Stephens / WNIJ

The union representing Kishwaukee College teachers says last night’s failed contract negotiations have moved both sides closer to a strike.