concealed carry

Wikipedia

Hidden handguns could be legally carried without a license in Wisconsin under a far-reaching, Republican-backed proposal being circulated for co-sponsors.

The bill unveiled Tuesday would also allow licensed concealed carry permit holders to bring firearms into places where they are currently barred, including school buildings, unless signs are posted prohibiting them.

Bill co-sponsor Republican Rep. Mary Felzkowski says its intent is to remove the "barrier of the concealed carry permit" so people can exercise their constitutional right to carry a gun.

"SW1911PD" by Flickr User Teknorat / (CC X 2.0)

The Supreme Court won't hear an appeal challenging Illinois' system for issuing permits for people to carry concealed weapons in public.

The justices on Monday let stand a lower court ruling that upheld the state's requirements for obtaining a concealed-carry license.

Three men sued state officials after they said a state review board denied their permit requests without offering an adequate explanation. After the state amended its regulations in 2015, the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the new requirements.

There is a pistol-packing revolution going on in America. Nearly 13 million Americans have permits to carry concealed handguns — triple the number just nine years ago — and that figure is low because not every state reports.

Greg Younger / cc by 2.0

 

Wisconsin’s governor has signed a bill legalizing concealed switchblades and knives. Scott Walker signed the measure Saturday at an annual National Rifle Association gathering in Wisconsin.  Walker says Wisconsin citizens have the fundamental right to defend themselves. 

Manufacturing, selling, transporting, purchasing, or possessing a switchblade has been illegal in Wisconsin for decades. The Republican bill eliminates that prohibition as well as permits anyone who can legally possess a gun to carry concealed knives of any length without a concealed carry license. 

WBEZ

It's been about two months since Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner approved changes to the state's concealed carry law. It was the first amendment since the law's creation.

Dennis Leifheit is a northern Illinois concealed carry instructor. He says a big change approved by Rauner was no longer requiring a firearm owner to unload the gun if it will be left in a car. Leifheit says it was a safety issue.  

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