education

Flickr user JayMase / "Physical Education" (CC V 2.0)

Nearly 15 percent of northern Illinois school districts still have not complied with the state mandate for public school physical education class five days a week.

Thirty public school districts in the WNIJ listening area still do not have physical education classes five days a week. They all received waivers which have now expired – some as long ago as 2002. 

Wisconsin has Illinois beat when it comes to some state school rankings, according to one report.

When it comes to variables like drop-out rate, school safety and test scores, Wisconsin ranked 5th overall in the country – whereas Illinois ranked 13th. That’s according to a WalletHub report, which uses data from national collection agencies like the U.S. Census Bureau, the National Center for Educational Statistics and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

IBHE

During the recent state budget impasse, Illinois colleges and universities have been forced to scrape by without state funding, except for stop gap money designed to keep them open through the fall semester. But that may not satisfy accreditation agencies. James Applegate, director of the Illinois Board of Higher Education, says the Higher Learning Commission may just home in on the fact that Illinois schools are missing what schools in other states have: a solid budget.

Katie Finlon / WNIJ

The Northern Illinois University Anthropology and Theatre & Dance departments will be without a designated academic building for at least one more year.

The renovated NIU Stevens Building was supposed to be finished by this fall, but the state budget impasse delayed the project.

NIU spokesman Joe King says that, if the school gets funding by next month, the “best case scenario” would be that the construction will be done by fall 2017. But he says the longer it takes to pass a state budget, the longer those students don’t get those “first-rate facilities.”

The Streator Elementary District board is considering applying with the state for a waiver to pursue the shortened week.

Officials say it could result in more than $300,000 in savings.

The district faces declining enrollment and financial difficulties.

In fact, the district faces state intervention if it doesn’t resolve its budget issues.

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