Education

Education and learning

"Cap and Diploma" by Flickr User bluefieldphotos bp / (CC X 2.0)

Adults in Illinois who failed to graduate from high school still can earn a General Educational Development certificate, also known as a GED.

But legislation approved by the General Assembly would provide what some consider to be a better alternative.

Students leave high school for a variety of reasons. Some drop out because of family obligations, financial pressures, or lack of motivation. Some are pushed out due to disciplinary problems. Once they reach age 21, their only option is to get a GED.

niu.edu / afscme.org

A state employee union has filed a new charge against Northern Illinois University for not bargaining in good faith.

The AFSCME Council 31 charges that NIU refused to bargain with the newly certified unit over mandatory subjects like holidays and sick time. AFSCME spokeswoman Sara Dorner says NIU suggested that the bargaining unit should withdraw proposals for language that appears in the university’s contracts with its other two units.

Flickr user Brent Hoard "ECU School of Education Class Room" (CC BY 2.0)

A northern Illinois community college is taking steps to make textbooks more affordable for students.

McHenry County College said the school could save the student body an estimated $400,000 on textbooks per school year.

This follows a week-long Textbook Cost Reduction Camp held for faculty members in all areas of study.

The camp set out to educate faculty members on textbook alternatives and prepare them to introduce new technology into the classroom.

The faculty-led initiative analyzed 13 courses to find high-quality resources for students at a lower cost.

Susan Stephens / WNIJ

Lawmakers approved a state budget more than a week ago, but that legislation requires enactment of a new school-funding plan.

Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner held news conferences Monday to “demand, not request” that the bill be sent to his desk so he can change it as he sees fit. Democrats have delayed sending it along.  

Democrats have passed such a plan through both chambers, but Rauner says he’ll veto parts of it because it gives too much money to Chicago Public Schools.

"Teachers Pet" by Flickr User Matthew / (CC X 2.0)

The shakeup in Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner’s office could signal a tougher stance on school funding.

The state spending plan requires adoption of a new funding formula, but Rauner has promised to veto the plan that got legislative approval; that’s because it includes money for Chicago teacher pensions.

This standoff might make the lawsuit filed by 20 school superintendents more relevant.  

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