Education

Education and learning

understandthescore.org

Only five high schools in the WNIJ listening area have more than half of their students ready for college.

The top school among them is Geneva Community High School, where 66 percent of its students met or exceeded expectations during the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers, according to test results released Friday.

PARCC Test Results Released In Illinois

Dec 14, 2015
WUIS

Illinois schools got results for the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers -- or PARCC -- test late last week. That’s the standardized test aligned with the Common Core. Scores were low across the state.

Tony Smith is the state superintendent of schools. He says that’s because it’s not comparing students to each other, but to what they should know.

Flickr User Brent Hoard/ "ECU School of Education Class Room" (cc by 2.0)

President Barack Obama today signed the Every Student Succeeds Act --- a rewrite of No Child Left Behind.

The new law, referred to as ESSA, passed with bipartisan support in both chambers of Congress.

It replaces the wildly unpopular law that's been referred to as No Child Left Untested. Educators are so enthusiastic about this rewrite, the heads of two Illinois teachers unions flew to Washington to witness its signing.

Dusty Rhodes / WUIS/Illinois Public Radio

As college students wrap up the fall semester, there is still a lot of uncertainty for the coming months. Low-income student who rely on the Monetary Award Program to pay for tuition have no guarantee the money will arrive. 

Most colleges and universities have been fronting the money for their students – like Northern Illinois University – but even the University of Illinois has warned MAP recipients they may have to repay their grants if the budget impasse drags on through the spring semester.

NIU Students Santa's Helpers

Dec 9, 2015

Northern Illinois University professor David Henningsen incorporated a project into his Group Communications course that will benefit area teenagers through The Lutheran Child and Family Services of Illinois. He says the agency expressed the need to collect Christmas items for teens, and that people have been generous with gifts for small children. But the older children have limited items to choose from. "Often the older kids were overlooked, so that was a challenge they were facing."

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