Education

Education and learning

November marked the beginning of enrollment for the state's prepaid tuition plan, called College Illinois!

The punctuation is part of the registered trademark.  But despite the clever branding, excitement about the plan seems to be waning, thanks to the ongoing state budget impasse. Eric Zarnikow, director of the Illinois Student Assistance Commission, says contract sales fell to just 500 last year, down from 650 the year before.

WNIJ News invites you to gain real-world journalism experience in a professional newsroom.

Learn about news reporting and production as well as the spirit that drives good journalism in the “Public Radio 101” seminar.

WNIJ News professionals again are offering a three-session introductory, noncredit seminar at the start of the 2017 NIU Spring semester from 6 to 8:30 p.m. on three successive Mondays -- Jan. 23, Jan. 30 and Feb. 6 -- at the NIU Broadcast Center, 801 N. First Street, DeKalb.

Seminar topics include:

WNIJ News

A total of 12 participants completed the inaugural WNIJ News “Public Radio 101” seminar, held over the September evenings at the Northern Illinois University Broadcast Center.

The class included two students from Kishwaukee College and two NIU staff members as well as eight NIU students at various stages of pursuing degrees in the communications field. All of them expressed interest in pursuing careers in the journalism or communications fields.

Flickr user Adikos / "Female Typing" (CC BY 2.0)

Three school districts are going into their second year for a three-year state e-learning day trial program. But they ran into an obstacle in monitoring the progress of the program.

All three districts participating in the trial program have not been able to use any e-learning days. That’s because superintendents from Gurnee School District 56, Community High School District 94 in West Chicago, and Leyden High School District 212 in Franklin Park say they didn’t use any snow days last school year.

State Report Card Shows Students Fall Short Of Academic Benchmarks

Oct 31, 2016
State of Illinois

The Illinois State Board of Education releases its 2016 report cards today. They analyze how well the state’s public schools are educating Illinois students. 

More than 60 percent of students failed to meet state benchmarks in math and English. That’s according to results from the second year using the standardized test known as PARCC.

Board of Education analyst John Barker says PARCC gives Illinois a clearer picture of the state’s challenges.

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