Gov. Scott Walker

https://walker.wi.gov/

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker is suggesting he's open to lifting the statute of limitations on civil child sex abuse lawsuits.

 

Women's March of Wisconsin has asked all candidates for elected office to support a version of the Child Victims Act, a legislative template that lifts states' statute of limitations on civil child sexual abuse lawsuits.

Environmentalists are concerned about Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker’s plans to do away with the magazine produced by the state Department of Natural Resources. 

The Wisconsin State-Journal reports the closure is part of the governor’s 2017-19 budget plan. Spokespeople for Walker say the DNR should be more narrowly focused and not be in the publishing business.   

Planned Parenthood

The state Senate has passed a bill that would strip Planned Parenthood of federal grant money.

That measure would require the state to apply for federal Title X grant money, which currently all goes to Planned Parenthood.

The money can't be used for abortions. Under the bill, abortion providers couldn't get any money; the grants instead would go to the state's Well Woman program, which provides breast and cervical cancer screenings.

The move would cost Planned Parenthood about $3 million per year.

Wikipedia

Democratic legislative leaders say they want to hear bold plans from Gov. Scott Walker during today’s State of the State address.

Rep. Peter Barca and Sen. Jennifer Shilling said yesterday that the Republican governor needs to work with them to strengthen the state's middle class and improve its infrastructure.

They say Democrats have a suite of proposals aimed at boosting working families, including creating a child care tax credit, expanding broadband access in rural areas and restructuring student loan debt.

Vijay Kumar Koulampet, CC BY-SA 3.0 / via Wikimedia Commons

The Wisconsin state Assembly has approved a tougher penalty for hiding a corpse.

Right now, hiding a corpse is a Class G felony that carries a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison and a $25,000 fine. The Republican-authored bill would classify the crime as a more severe Class F felony punishable by up to 12.5 years in prison and $25,000 in fines.

The Assembly approved the bill on a voice vote Tuesday. The Senate approved the bill on a voice vote in June.

Pages