Government

Government and Legislature

Mark Wilson / Getty Images

Updated at 10:26 p.m. ET

President Trump sought to strike a unifying tone with his first State of the Union address, but some of his rhetoric has been aimed clearly at his base on immigration and his promise to put "America First."

U.S. Congress

Although they are from different political parties, two members of Congress from northern Illinois expressed remarkably similar sentiments Monday about the Senate action attempting to end the government shutdown and what lies ahead.

In separate interviews with WNIJ News, Republican Adam Kinzinger of the 16th District and Democrat Cheri Bustos of the 17th District both agreed that it is better to have the government open in order to move forward.

Neither of them liked the string of short-term continuing budget resolutions that led to the three-day shutdown.

Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

A partial government shutdown now looks inevitable after the Senate lacks the votes on a stopgap spending bill late Friday night.

The vote was 50-48 in favor of the measure with Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., yet to vote.

The White House, Senate Republicans and Senate Democrats were unable to reach a deal to get to the 60 votes needed to proceed after a flurry of meetings, leading to finger-pointing and blame over who was responsible for the unprecedented shutdown on the one-year anniversary of President Trump's inauguration.

Public interviews will be held Monday for 10 applicants who hope to serve as Winnebago County Clerk for the next 10 months.

The current clerk, Democrat Margie Mullins, announced last month that she will step down at the end of January.

State law requires that the appointee must be of the same political party as the outgoing clerk. Officials are checking primary voting records to ensure the party status of applicants.

Susan Stephens/WNIJ

Sexual harassment and assault allegations against high-profile entertainment and news executives have surged over the past few months. They spurred the “#MeToo” movement, in which people took to social media to disclose their own stories as victims. The campaign sparked questions of how sexual harassment in the workplace is handled.

In this week Friday Forum, WNIJ’s Jessie Schlacks examines the prevalence of sexual harassment on a smaller scale – and how local officials are working to amend their own policies.

Pages