Government

Government and Legislature

In light of recent violence toward random victims and police officers, the DeKalb police department wants the community to know about the "I've Got Your Back" campaign. It didn't take long for the Facebook universe to respond. As as 9/3/15, the Facebook post on the campaign had nearly 1,000 shares and 1,400 "likes."

AFSCME

Government labor unions lost a fight with Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner yesterday.

AFSCME and other unions say the governor is making unreasonable demands in contract negotiations. But the governor and like-minded Republicans, such as Representative Jeanne Ives of Wheaton, say unions are asking for more than Illinois can afford.

"Some of you are going to be winners, and some of you are going to be losers,” Ives said. “And what you're going to lose is your livelihood, because there's no other way to pay for this."

Illinois Railroad Association

Last year, 269 people were killed in the US at rail crossings. 40% of those happened in just five states…and Illinois is one of them.

flickr/dankdepot

Illinois may miss a deadline to rule on proposals for more qualifying conditions for medical marijuana. The main sponsor of the program in the General Assembly says he’s not worried.

Monday went by without Illinois Public Health Director Nirav Shah ruling on whether to add 11 illnesses to the 40 to be covered when the state’s first medical marijuana dispensaries open. That will likely be sometime in the fall. 

The list of recommendations from Illinois’ Medical Cannabis Advisory Board include Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, osteoarthritis, and migraines. 

WUIS

A government labor union says it's confident the Illinois House will side with it over Gov. Bruce Rauner. A key vote on whether to override Rauner's veto of a union-backed bill is expected Wednesday.

The legislation would bar unions from striking and prohibit the governor from locking workers out. Instead, if the parties can’t agree on a contract, an arbitrator would decide.

WBEZ

It's been about two months since Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner approved changes to the state's concealed carry law. It was the first amendment since the law's creation.

Dennis Leifheit is a northern Illinois concealed carry instructor. He says a big change approved by Rauner was no longer requiring a firearm owner to unload the gun if it will be left in a car. Leifheit says it was a safety issue.  

WUIS

A marijuana advocacy group is urging Illinois lawmakers to accept Governor Bruce Rauner's changes to a marijuana decriminalization plan. 

In his amendatory veto, the Governor supported lowering penalties for possession of pot but he did tighten the amount someone could have to avoid a criminal charge.  

The National Organization to Reform Marijuana laws says it's still a move in the right direction.

A last-minute appointment former Governor Pat Quinn made after losing last year's election has spurred a new law.

Lou Bertuca was a political operative, a key player in Quinn's ultimately failed campaign.

Shortly before Quinn left the governor's mansion, he helped make sure Bertuca had his next job locked up.

Quinn appointed Bertuca, then 30 years old, to a multi-year contract with an annual salary of $160,000 as CEO of the Illinois Sports Facilities Authority.

dojmt.gov

The Illinois Attorney General is hailing a new state law that will prevent hospitals from billing survivors of sexual assault for medical forensic exams.

Lisa Madigan, who pushed for the legislation, says it removes a barrier that may keep some rape victims from going to the hospital immediately after the crime.

Federal law requires Illinois to certify that survivors are not being billed for “rape kit” exams. That’s a condition of receiving federal funds.

state of Illinois

Illinois nears the end of August, and there's still no state budget in place. But House members will return to Springfield today.

The Illinois House controls the fate of a measure that's not a budget bill, per say, but which Gov. Bruce Rauner says could have major financial ramifications for the state.

It'd prevent his ability to lock out state workers -- something he's said he won't do -- as well as forbid employees from striking. Instead, an arbitrator would settle an impasse if Rauner and the AFSCME union can't agree to a new contract.

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