gun control

MIKAELA LEFRAK / WAMU

With more student protests expected after the shooting in Parkland, Fla., the American Civil Liberties Union of Illinois is encouraging schools to "nurture your students’ efforts to learn for themselves about participatory democracy."

In an open letter published Monday, the civil liberties group suggests excusing absences for students who demonstrate.

Rachel Otwell / NPR Illinois | 91.9 UIS

Hundreds of people descended on the statehouse Wednesday to urge legislators to pass stricter gun regulations.

Moms Demand Action For Gun Sense has chapters across the country. It was founded in 2012 as a response to the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary.

Member Lindsay Aikman is a high school teacher in Champaign. She said it's heartening to see students from Florida demand government action in the wake of a shooting that killed 17 of their peers.

DeKalb Police Department

In response to a Florida massacre and the killing of a Chicago police officer, the Democrat-controlled Illinois House pushed through some gun control measures Wednesday, endorsing a bump-stock ban and a minimum age of 21 for buying assault-style weapons.

The House voted to prohibit the sale of bump stocks and "trigger cranks," which increase the firing rates of rifles, effectively making them assault-style weapons. Also approved was a bar on anyone younger than 21 buying assault-style weapons of the type used in the shooting deaths of 17 students in Parkland, Fla.

Daisy Contreras / NPR Illinois

Several gun-related proposals passed an Illinois House committee hearing Tuesday. 

Gun control supporters in attendance included members of the Chicago Police Department, who stood behind the so-called "Paul Bauer Act" —  drafted in memory of the Chicago police commander killed by a man wearing body armor. The measure would prohibit its use and set a limit on high-capacity ammunition devices.

Chicago Police Supt. Eddie Johnson told lawmakers it’s up to them to prevent similar tragedies going forward.

Flickr user Brent Hoard "ECU School of Education Class Room" (CC BY 2.0)

President Donald Trump’s proposal to arm teachers as a school safety precaution doesn’t sit well with Illinois teachers.

Illinois Federation of Teachers president Dan Montgomery says he has yet to talk to an educator who thinks it’s a good idea. He says this could affect the teacher shortage.

“People are not going to want to go into the profession if the job description includes being a paramilitary officer who may well have to shoot children,” he says.

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