Illinois

IDOC

The Illinois Department of Corrections has agreed to pay $450,000 to a man who says prison officials punished and humiliated him after he reported his cellmate raped him.

The man's attorneys announced the settlement of his federal lawsuit Friday.

He was imprisoned for eight months for a minor drug offense, and was housed in a cell at the Logan Correctional Center in Lincoln with a gang member serving 22 years for armed robbery.

The lawsuit says his cellmate raped him in August 2011.

"Kimber Custom II" By Flickr User Madison Scott-Clary

The Chicago Police Department has released a statement in response to Dwyane Wade's call for tougher gun laws, saying officers are waging an "unwavering" fight against criminals but need help.

The statement from department spokesman Anthony Guglielmi says making the city safer will depend on strong partnerships with the community.

He says the "fight against violent offenders who torment neighborhoods with gun violence is unwavering."

Guglielmi adds that police "need help to ensure these individuals stay off our streets after repeated arrests for guns."

Bishop Emeritus Of Rockford Catholic Diocese Dies

Sep 1, 2016
rockforddiocese.org

Reverend Thomas G. Doran of the Catholic Diocese of Rockford died today at the age of 80.

Doran was appointed the eighth Bishop of the Rockford Diocese in 1994 and served until he retired on 2012.

He was the second native born priest of the Rockford Diocese to serve as its bishop.

Doran studied in Rome and became a national expert in the Church’s Canon Law. 

IDOT

Gov. Bruce Rauner has laid off 29 Illinois Department of Transportation employees who were among those improperly hired based on political connections.

The Republican said Thursday he issued notices to the so-called ``staff assistants'' hired by skirting personnel rules under two previous Democratic governors. They were told their last day is Sept. 15.  

Hundreds of people were hired into the position starting in 2003. The state's inspector general found in 2014 that the politically connected hires should have been put into their positions based on merit.  

The Illinois Supreme Court says it has created new rules to deal with a new state law that decriminalizes possessing small amounts of marijuana.

The high court said Thursday that it has adopted six new rules to establish procedures for the court system to follow when handling civil law violations.

Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner signed the marijuana decriminalization legislation in July that creates civil law violations. The state Supreme Court says that type of violation didn't exist before the measure became law.

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