immigration

Cass Herrington/Peoria Public Radio

President Donald Trump’s order to deport immigrants living in the U.S. illegally left many undocumented people and their families feeling unsettled.

In response, immigrant rights advocates are mobilizing to spread information about how to better prepare for encounters with immigration officials.

 

“Fear debilitates you,” community organizer Jorge Mujica said. “We are in a full campaign against fear. Good information organizes, so what we are doing is giving people good information.”

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Illinois has joined a group of states supporting a temporary restraining order against President Trump’s revised travel ban.

Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan joined colleagues in twelve other states and the District of Columbia in filing an amicus brief Monday supporting the state of Hawaii in its case against the revised Executive Order on immigration. They argue that the latest travel ban still contains unconstitutional parts of the original order.

Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly unveiled new policies on Tuesday that are aimed at detaining and deporting more immigrants in the U.S. illegally.

The two memos, signed by Kelly, lay out a series of steps the department plans to take to implement President Donald Trump's executive orders from late January. Those orders called for increased border security and better enforcement of the nation's immigration laws.

Susan Stephens / WNIJ

The President’s recent executive order put in place a 90-day ban on entry visas for immigrants from seven predominantly Muslim nations (Syria, Iran, Iraq, Somalia, Libya, Sudan and Yemen).  And it’s worrying the international community at NIU.

The concern is particularly strong among those present on a student visa.  Stephanie Brown, Associate Director of the International Student and Faculty Office, says only a small number of NIU's roughly 1,100 international students are affected directly. 

Updated at 10:30 p.m. ET

President Trump has fired Acting Attorney General Sally Yates, concluding she has "betrayed the Department of Justice" by refusing to defend his executive order that imposes a temporary ban on refugees and visa holders from seven majority-Muslim countries.

In a statement, the White House called Yates, an Obama administration holdover with 27 years of experience prosecuting corrupt public officials and the man who bombed the Atlanta Olympic park, "weak on borders and very weak on illegal immigration."

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