Jesse Jackson Jr.

The Bureau of Prisons says former U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr. has officially completed his 21/2-year prison sentence for spending $750,000 in campaign money on personal items.

Bureau spokesman Edmond Ross says the Illinois Democrat's home confinement in Washington, D.C., will be lifted Friday and his ankle monitor removed. Ross says inmates whose release dates fall on a Sunday are always released two days earlier.

Susan Walsh/AP

Former Illinois Congressman Jesse Jackson Jr. is back home in Washington for the first time in almost two years. 

Jackson will serve the remaining three months of his federal prison sentence at home, followed by three years of supervised release.

The former South Side congressman was sent to prison in 2013 for spending campaign money on lavish personal items. Jackson spent about a year-and-a-half in an Alabama federal prison, and another three months in a Baltimore halfway house.

U.S. Marshals Service

Michael Jackson, Bruce Lee, and a pile of expensive furs are on the auction block tomorrow. U.S. Marshals are selling off some of the valuable possessions of former Illinois Congressman Jesse Jackson, Jr. and his wife, former Chicago alderman Sandra Stevens Jackson. 

Jackson Junior Sentenced To 30 Months In Prison

Aug 14, 2013

Former Illinois Congressman Jesse Jackson Jr. received a 2-and-a-half year prison term Wednesday. He was sentenced after pleading guilty to misusing $750,000 in campaign money.

Sentencing This Week For Jackson Jr.

Jul 1, 2013

A federal judge will sentence Jesse Jackson Junior and his wife for stealing campaign money. His lawyers are expected to bring up the ex-Congressman’s mental illness.

Jackson Junior pleaded guilty in February to stealing $750,000 from his campaign account, and spending it on lavish personal items. Defense attorney Reid Weingarten then suggested he might bring up Jackson’s struggle with bi-polar disorder to argue for a lighter sentence.

Sentencing Arguments In Jackson Case

Jun 17, 2013

Lawyers for Jesse Jackson Junior on Monday are expected to argue against prosecutors’ recommended prison sentences for the former Illinois Congressman and his wife.

Illinois’ Second Congressional District has a voice again. Democrat Robin Kelly easily beat five opponents in the special election to fill former Congressman Jesse Jackson, Jr.’s U.S. House seat. The district has been without representation since Jackson resigned in November, shortly after winning re-election, in spite of corruption allegations and an extended leave to deal with bipolar depression. 

Congressman Jesse Jackson, Jr. has resigned: a spokesman for House Speaker John Boehner confirms he has received Jackson's letter of resignation.

Congressman Not Likely to Step Aside

Oct 22, 2012

Congressman Jesse Jackson Jr. has until the end of business Monday to take his name off the November ballot.  It is the last chance to remove his name and still have Democratic Party bosses handpick a replacement candidate. Over the weekend, he sent a recorded message to constituents.

Illinois Congressman Jesse Jackson, Jr. is being treated for bipolar depression II, according to a news release from the Mayo Clinic.