Pat Quinn


How would contenders for the state's top legal office have handled the budget stalemate?

One of the limitations of modern political debates is that candidates are usually only asked what they'll do. But in this era of political dysfunction and governmental obstruction, it can be just as important to know what a candidate might choose not to do.


In 2010, lawmakers changed the rules for how the state picks its second-in-command. No longer would voters separately nominate candidates for lieutenant governor and governor in the primary, and hope for a successful match.


He tried to warn us. At the very least, he tried to be upfront about his past. That he'd been charged with domestic battery.

Brian Mackey / Illinois Public Radio

A new report by a court-appointed watchdog charged with looking into patronage hiring at the Illinois transportation department details how friends and relatives of top Democrats were hired under former Gov. Pat Quinn, even as many had little or no experience.


The Chicago Tribune reports the findings released Monday are the result of an inquiry that began in 2014 after a federal judge assigned a lawyer to dig into hiring at the Illinois Department of Transportation.


Former Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn says a voter referendum aimed at imposing term limits on Chicago's mayor and creating a consumer advocacy position won't make the November ballot.

Quinn told The Associated Press he's short of the roughly 53,000 signatures required by a Monday deadline. The Democrat says his goal is to get 100,000 signatures, and he's got roughly 20,000.

He launched the petition drive in June but wouldn't say for which election. He tells AP he's aiming for the 2018 primary, when Illinois next elects a governor.

A last-minute appointment former Governor Pat Quinn made after losing last year's election has spurred a new law.

Lou Bertuca was a political operative, a key player in Quinn's ultimately failed campaign.

Shortly before Quinn left the governor's mansion, he helped make sure Bertuca had his next job locked up.

Quinn appointed Bertuca, then 30 years old, to a multi-year contract with an annual salary of $160,000 as CEO of the Illinois Sports Facilities Authority.