Political news

State of Wisconsin

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker's approval rating among the state's voters is still falling even after his exit from the presidential race last week. 

A Marquette University Law School poll released Wednesday, Sept. 30, shows Walker's job approval rating is 37 percent.  That is down from 39 percent in August, when he was in the midst of his failed presidential run.   62 percent said they would not like to see Walker run for a third term as governor in 2018.

State of Wisconsin

Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker's job approval rating dropped to record lows the month after he formally announced his run for president. A Marquette University Law School poll to be released today will assess how residents feel about Walker since he abruptly dropped out of the race last week.

Walker says he plans to refocus his energy on being governor and traveling around the state.

Walker spent little time in Wisconsin during his presidential run, which officially began on July 13th. But Walker was traveling extensively around the country all year before that.


If it felt like Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker did not spend much time in the state after announcing his run for president…it's because he didn't.

Walker's official calendar for July was released to The Associated Press under Wisconsin's open records law. It shows Walker spent one day that month in Wisconsin on official business after launching his presidential run July 13.

That one day was to attend a Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation board meeting and to sign a bill banning abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy.


Critics say Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders is too liberal, but he's gaining in polls against presumed Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton. 

On Monday, he took his campaign to Illinois.

In 1964, Sanders graduated from the University of Chicago in a ceremony at the on-campus Rockefeller chapel.

Now as a U.S. Senator from Vermont, Sanders returned to students packing the pews to hear him speak.

Federal Plea Deal Possible For Dennis Hastert

Sep 28, 2015
"Dennis Hastert 109th pictorial photo" by United States Congress

There's a possible plea deal in the works for former U.S. House Speaker Dennis Hastert. He is charged with violating banking laws and lying to the FBI about alleged "hush money."

Prosecutors and defense attorneys told a federal judge they're talking about a possible plea deal for the 73-year-old Republican. This came about at a hearing in federal court in Chicago. Details have not been released yet.


Illinois is about to enter its fourth month without a budget. One of the state's top Democrats says the problem could be resolved within days, if the governor moved off his insistence that other laws pass first.

The last time Gov. Bruce Rauner and the legislative leaders all got together was when the state had no budget crisis; it was apparently in late May, before the last fiscal year was over.

Planned Parenthood

Planned Parenthood in Wisconsin would no longer be eligible for about $3.5 million a year in federal funding under a bill before the state Assembly.

The measure up for a vote Thursday seeks to have the state take control of the federal Title X money that currently all goes to Planned Parenthood.

state of Illinois

For the first time in three weeks, state representatives will convene Thursday in Springfield.

Not much has changed in those three weeks. There's still no agreement between Democratic legislators and Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner on a state budget.

But representatives are back anyway, and they do have some budget measures on the table.

For one, they're set to discuss Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel's proposal to exempt some middle-class homeowners from paying higher property taxes.

Senator Dick Durbin is urging Congress to pass a long-term transportation plan. He used a bridge in Rockford to illustrate a problem plaguing the nation. Durbin and Rockford-area lawmakers held a news conference Monday under the Jefferson Street Bridge while it was getting some much-needed repairs.

Update: Wednesday 5:26 P.M. A federal judge has ruled that in-home services for senior citizens are covered by Medicaid and should be funded, despite the budget impasse.

Attorneys for the State of Illinois are expected back in federal court today. The state is being challenged for not funding in-home care for seniors during the budget impasse.