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Many political experts say House Speaker Paul Ryan will beat his Republican challenger during Wisconsin's August 9 partisan primary. Matt Streb isn't so sure.

Streb, a political science professor at Northern Illinois University, notes that Sarah Palin endorsed Ryan's challenger, Paul Nehlin, because Ryan was slow to endorse Donald Trump, the GOP's presidential nominee. But Streb isn't thinking about Palin.

Amanda Vinicky

Donald Trump is now the Republican nominee for President, after delegates in Cleveland awarded him their votes Tuesday night. For some Illinois Republicans, it’s a time for vindication and celebration. But others remain wary.

The real work of nominating a major party candidate for president is done in the caucuses and primaries that began what may seem like ages ago.

Actually, the Iowa caucuses were less than six months ago – in the blistering cold of early February.

'Nuns On The Bus' Are Driving Toward Social Reform

Jul 16, 2016
Judith Valente/WGLT

The socially-conscious Nuns on the Bus tour, which gained national attention during the 2012 presidential election, rolled through Illinois last week as part of a 13-state schedule that will include stops at both the Republican and Democratic National Conventions.

Their theme this year is "Mend the Gaps: Reweave the Fabric of Society." The nine sisters on board said they hope to draw attention to the growing gap between rich and poor, among other social justice issues. 

Michael Tercha/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images / NPR

Some Illinois delegates for Donald Trump say they’ll skip next week’s political convention in protest of their own state Republican Party.

Rich Nordstrom won election in the Republican primary to go to next week’s National Convention as a delegate and officially vote for Donald Trump to be the party’s nominee. But Nordstrom isn’t sure he’ll go, saying he’s bothered the top Illinois Republicans -- like Governor Bruce Rauner – are not going.

Flickr user Marc Nozell / "Hillary Clinton in Hampton, NH (April 2007)" (CC v 2.0)

Hillary Clinton returned to Illinois’s capital city today to give a speech focused on racial tensions and other divisions that she says hold back the nation. 

Clinton says recent turmoil has blacks questioning whether their lives matter, while economic turmoil has workers questioning whether America cares about their future. She says in times like this, the nation needs a President who can pull all sides together.

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