Politics

Political news

Ahn Young-joon/AP

President Trump has called off a highly anticipated June 12 summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

"Sadly, based on the tremendous anger and open hostility displayed in your most recent statement, I feel it is inappropriate, at this time, to have this long planned meeting," Trump wrote in a letter to Kim.

Trump's decision comes hours after North Korean Vice Foreign Minister Choe Son Hui, in remarks carried on the country's official KCNA news service, said it would not "beg the U.S. for dialogue" and warned that it could make Washington "taste an appalling tragedy."

Brian Mackey/Illinois Public Radio

An aide to Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner says the gun restrictions the Republican wrapped together in a contentious veto are not an "all-or-nothing deal."

 

David Risely is Rauner's criminal justice director. He said Wednesday that Rauner would approve separate bills covering the additional issues. They include a 72-hour waiting period for delivery of any gun, a bump-stock ban and a procedure for removing guns from dangerous people.

https://walker.wi.gov/

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker is suggesting he's open to lifting the statute of limitations on civil child sex abuse lawsuits.

 

Women's March of Wisconsin has asked all candidates for elected office to support a version of the Child Victims Act, a legislative template that lifts states' statute of limitations on civil child sexual abuse lawsuits.

Democratic challenger Sara Dady and incumbent Republican U.S. Rep. Adam Kinzinger found some agreement and some differences on issues affecting the 16th Illinois Congressional District during their first appearance together Monday.

Opioids

Both candidates agreed that the opioid epidemic is a serious issue that needs to be addressed by government, law enforcement, and health services.  But Dady stressed that the federal government should provide ten years of full funding so local agencies can carry out treatment efforts.

Illinois Department of Human Services

Twenty attorneys general are challenging Trump administration rule changes they say will reduce access to family planning services.  

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra said Tuesday that the president is playing politics with patients by changing rules that would shift federal family planning funds toward organizations that stress abstinence.

The AGs filed a brief supporting lawsuits filed in Washington two weeks ago by Planned Parenthood groups in Wisconsin, Ohio and Utah, and the National Family Planning & Reproductive Health Association.

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