politics

Flickr user Marc Nozell / "Hillary Clinton in Hampton, NH (April 2007)" (CC v 2.0)

Hillary Clinton returned to Illinois’s capital city today to give a speech focused on racial tensions and other divisions that she says hold back the nation. 

Clinton says recent turmoil has blacks questioning whether their lives matter, while economic turmoil has workers questioning whether America cares about their future. She says in times like this, the nation needs a President who can pull all sides together.

Northern Illinois University

Presidential candidate Donald Trump’s controversial remarks could affect the Illinois U.S. Senate race, according to one expert.

Northern Illinois University political scientist Matt Streb says he can’t remember a time when candidates distanced themselves from their party’s nominee. He says this is affecting the race between incumbent Republican Sen. Mark Kirk and Democratic Congresswoman Tammy Duckworth.

Republican Mark Kirk Says He Won't Support Trump

Jun 7, 2016
Facebook

The junior U.S. Senator from Illinois has reached a breaking point in support for his party's presidential candidate.

Kirk said Tuesday that, as the presidential campaign progressed, he was hoping the rhetoric would tone down and reflect a campaign that’s "inclusive, thoughtful and principled."

But he says Trump’s latest statements about a federal judge of Mexican heritage were dead wrong and un-American.

Kirk has said he’d support the party’s nominee.

U.S. Sen. Mark Kirk (L) and U.S. Rep Tammy Duckworth (R)

The newly chosen Illinois Democratic candidate for the U.S. Senate, Tammy Duckworth, says she backs President Barack Obama's choice for the U.S. Supreme Court.  She's calling on her opponent to do the same. 

The U.S. Senate's Republican leader says he'll block Supreme Court nominee Merrick Garland. 

But Rep. Duckworth says Garland has "impeccable credentials."

Duckworth is campaigning to take Republican Mark Kirk's Senate seat from him. 

Amato For State's Attorney / Facebook

One candidate pulled ahead in a pack of three in the race for the Republican nomination for DeKalb County State’s Attorney.

Rick Amato has about 44 percent of the vote. Former State’s Attorney Clay Campbell has about 31 percent of the vote while Chuck Rea has 25 percent.

The winner faces Democrat Richard Schmack in the general election in November. He ran unopposed.

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