redistricting

Illinois Supreme Court

The Illinois Supreme Court has agreed to quickly consider a case challenging the constitutionality of a ballot measure that could change the way Illinois draws political boundaries.

The court granted an emergency motion for direct appeal Friday, two days after a Cook County judge ruled the proposal didn't meet narrow constitutional requirements.

A group called the Independent Map Amendment sought an expedited appeal because of an Aug. 26 deadline to get on November's ballot.

mapamendment.org

The so-called Independent Maps proposal would have asked voters to change the state constitution — so instead of legislators drawing House and Senate districts, that work would be done by an special commission.

Illinois has strict limits on changing the constitution by referendum, and a Cook County judge ruled that the remap proposal did not meet the requirements.

Independent Maps spokesman Jim Bray says the group will appeal.

mapamendment.org

A measure giving Illinois voters a chance to decide if an independent commission should draw the state's political boundaries is a step closer to the ballot.

The State Board of Elections voted Monday that the group called the Independent Map Amendment appeared to have enough valid signatures for the constitutional amendment and is ready for ballot certification in August.

However, a lawsuit against the amendment is pending which could keep it from the ballot. In 2014, a judge ruled a similar measure was unconstitutional.

mapamendment.org

Supporters of changing how Illinois draws its legislative maps are defending their effort in court.

  

The initiative is facing a lawsuit, similar to one that brought down a redistricting plan two years ago. Both attempts would have a commission to draw districts, instead of lawmakers themselves.

David Mellett is the Independent Maps campaign manager. He says the 2014 judge's ruling helped guide this year's plan.

mapamendment.org

A coalition wanting to change the state's redistricting process has cleared a big first hurdle. But it has another one ahead.

The State Board Of Elections says the group Independent Maps did collect enough signatures to put the issue on the ballot. Enough of them passed a sample test by the elections board.

Two years ago, a similar effort fell flat when the petitions failed to get that clearance. 

That doesn't mean the redistricting question is guaranteed a spot on the November ballot.

Pages