Rita Crundwell

To Avoid Another Crundwell, Dixon Changes Government

Apr 25, 2016
City of Dixon, Illinois

The city of Dixon radically restructured its government to a council-manager format. The changes come in the wake of the Rita Crundwell embezzlement scandal.  Officials hope these adjustments will prevent a similar case of fraud.  

Susan Stephens / WNIJ

The fourth online auction of former Dixon comptroller Rita Crundwell’s personal possessions is up and running. It began Tuesday. 

The auction features items from about 200 lots that did not sell in a previous auction, according to Sauk Valley Media. Offerings include leather jackets, sweatshirts, a fur vest, jeans, and a fur coat. The U.S. Marshals Service Asset Forfeiture Division lowered opening bids on the items this go-round in an attempt to attract more buyers.

Susan Stephens / WNIJ

People interested in owning something that belonged to Dixon’s jailed former comptroller will get another chance.  The U.S. Marshals service will conduct an auction Feb. 23-March 8 of items that didn’t sell in the previous auction of Rita Crundwell’s possessions that ended last week.  Sauk Media reports opening bids will be lowered on the nearly 200 items in hopes of attracting buyers.  Most are women’s clothing, including western shirts, leather jackets, a fur vest and a fur coat. 

Susan Stephens / WNIJ

There may be another substantial amount of money from Rita Crundwell’s assets heading to the city of Dixon. The Justice Department has worked out a settlement with the former Dixon comptroller’s family.

Susan Stephens / WNIJ

Want to buy a trophy? Bridget Edgar hopes so. She’s the winner of the U.S. Marshals Service auction of hundreds of Rita Crundwell’s trophies, plaques, and statues. 

Crundwell is the former comptroller of Dixon who stole nearly $54 million from her hometown. Much of it was used to support her award-winning horse-breeding operations. She is now serving a nearly two-decade prison sentence. Her horses, homes and other possessions have been auctioned off by the federal government to help pay the cost of her prosecution and repay the city of Dixon.

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